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Definition

Occurrences of this Type (29)

  • A category of scripts derived from the same source. Usually the scripts in a script family are closely related, both historically and in features. (Script family)
  • A script is derived from another when it was clearly created with the other script as the single most important basis for the script, and when script model, character shapes, order, names, and sound values have been largely preserved. In some cases the script model will have changed to support a different language, and there needs to be differences in character repertoire sufficient to consider the two scripts distinct. (Derivation)
  • A standardized method for representing an ortography of a language in a script different from the one the ortography is actually written in. (Transliteration)
  • A standardized method for representing the sound of one language in a script not normally used to write that language. (Transcription)
  • A type of writing system in which each character represents a consonant followed by a specific vowel, and the other vowels are represented by a consistent modification of the consonant symbols. (Abugida)
  • A type of writing system that denotes consonants and vowels with separate characters. (Alphabet)
  • A type of writing system where only consonants are generally written. Some abjads have signs for vowels, but use them only in special cases, such as loanwords or special kinds of texts. (Abjad)
  • A type of writing system where the shape of each character has a systematic relation to the phonetic features of its sound value. (Featural)
  • A type of writing system whose characters denote morphemes, and a subset of whose characters can be used for their phonetic syllabic values without regard to their semantic values. (Logosyllabary)
  • A type of writing system whose characters denote syllables, with no deliberate graphic similarity between characters denoting phonetically similar syllables. (Syllabary)
  • Artificial scripts are scripts created for artificial or fictional languages, or which have never seen use as the primary script for a language community. (Artificial scripts)
  • Contains all the scripts derived from Ashokan brahmi used throughout southern Asia. The scrips are all of the same basic type, though with considerable variations. (Brahmic scripts)
  • Contains the greek alphabet and all its descendants, which are also alphabets. The scripts in this family all follow much the same principles. (Greek script family)
  • Contains the scripts derived from the aramaic abjad. These scripts have great family similarities, although some have developed into full alphabets. The brahmic scripts descend from the aramaic abjad, but have their own script group. (Aramaic script family)
  • Contains the scripts derived from the Pallava script that were used throughout the islands of south-east Asia. (Insular scripts of South-East Asia)
  • Contains the scripts derived from the Pallava script that were used throughout the mainland of south-east Asia. (South-East Asian scripts)
  • Contains the scripts descended from the proto-caananite script (also known as the northern linear abjad). These scripts show great systematic variation, and are united mainly by their common descent. The brahmic scripts have been separated out into a group of their own. (Semitic scripts)
  • Natural scripts are scripts which were created in order to serve a living natural language, and used by ordinary people to serve their day-to-day needs. (Natural scripts)
  • Scripts specifically designed for representing language with phonetic accuracy, and not intended to be used for ordinary orthographies for any language. (Phonetic scripts)
  • Shorthand systems are scripts used to record speech in real-time by people trained in shorthand. A shorthand differs from an ordinary script is that it has been designed to favour speed of writing over all other features, including completeness of information. A shorthand report may therefore not contain all the information needed to read the report; a memory of what was written may be necessary to be able to read it. (Shorthand)
  • The ancestral northern linear abjad quickly developed distinct northern and southern variants. The scripts in this group are the descendants of the northern variant. (Northern semitic script family)
  • The ancestral northern linear abjad quickly developed distinct northern and southern variants. The scripts in this group are the descendants of the southern variant. (Southern semitic script family)
  • The broadest category of natural scripts, reflecting the historical development of scripts, rather than being a typology based on their features. (Script group)
  • The broadest category of scripts, reflecting how the script came into being and what it has been used for, rather than being typology based on their features. (Script category)
  • The general term for a writing system consisting of a signary and the rules for assembling signs from the signary into text. (Script)
  • The north indic scripts are the scripts derived from the northern branch of Ashokan brahmi. These scripts show clear family resemblances. (North Indic scripts)
  • The sinitic scripts are the scripts derived from the Chinese scripts, as well as a number of other scripts designed to resemble it graphically, or to be used together with it for various purposes. (Sinitic scripts)
  • The south indic scripts are the scripts derived from the southern branch of Ashokan brahmi. These scripts show clear family resemblances. (South Indic scripts)
  • This is the number of distinct characters a script contains. If the script has two cases (upper and lower), both are counted. (Number of characters)
 
Object id: 108
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